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> New pump coming
gigem99
post Apr 16 2011, 03:34 AM
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I saw a deal about a new pump from Asante Solutions...it's called the Pearl. Here is a link to their announcement. I'm not sure what to think about this... evidently, the reservoir comes pre-filled, which actually confuses me.

They appear to have been approved by the CE, but not by the FDA yet.

Tom


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Tom
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LADA - dx'd 1985 at age 31 - treated as type 2
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Nell-wnc
post Apr 16 2011, 04:27 AM
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Some poster on another site keeps bringing this up. That may be where you saw it, but whatever. I have no interest in a prefilled reservoir. Imagine how much more the insulin will cost when bought that way. Even though my insurance pays for my insulin, I see no reason to encourage doubling the cost. I wonder what kind of marketing this company did to think this will be popular? I am sure there is a segment of pumpers who will want to pay for the convenience but--I just don't get it. Of course, I could be wrong. I never thought anyone would want to buy and wear those big lumps called Omnipods!
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Linda B
post Apr 16 2011, 11:49 AM
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Years ago Diesitronic had prefilled reservoirs. It is not a marketing gimmick. It is very useful for people with arthritic hands. It was a big selling point.

Linda B.


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Linda
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Nell-wnc
post Apr 16 2011, 02:01 PM
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I know a fair number of people with arthritic hands so I know about that. But how many are diabetics and on a pump? I am still not sure if the company will gain enough market share to stay in business. And where is Diesitronic and its prefilled reservoirs now!? And, FYI, I did not say or imply it was a gimmick. I think it is a company that thinks it has a feature that will be popular enough. Regardless, if a population of pumpers want it, fine by me. Oh, and I suspect there are a significant number of diabetics with impaired vision who would benefit for some new pump features.
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Aaron
post Apr 17 2011, 01:28 AM
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I remember at one time there was a pump available that took the penfill cartridges - that is, you could take a penfill cartridge and insert it in your pump as a reservoir. Does anyone remember which pump that was? Are there any pumps around that still do this?


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Aaron
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Arlene S.
post Apr 17 2011, 03:14 PM
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QUOTE(Nell-wnc @ Apr 16 2011, 10:01 AM) *
I know a fair number of people with arthritic hands so I know about that. But how many are diabetics and on a pump? I am still not sure if the company will gain enough market share to stay in business. And where is Diesitronic and its prefilled reservoirs now!? And, FYI, I did not say or imply it was a gimmick. I think it is a company that thinks it has a feature that will be popular enough. Regardless, if a population of pumpers want it, fine by me. Oh, and I suspect there are a significant number of diabetics with impaired vision who would benefit for some new pump features.


When I started pumping I had two choices: Minimed and Disetronic. The latter is no longer available in the US and Canada but Roche still supports the pump. People liked it because they got two pumps; the pre-filled cartridges were a selling point. I knew several people who had Disetronic pumps. Some eventually switched to MM but others loved their Disetronic pumps.


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Arlene S.
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tedm
post Apr 21 2011, 09:47 AM
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I recognize that pump. (IMG:style_emoticons/default/ohmy.gif) Several years ago, I was in a marketing study where they showed us a prototype pump and asked for our impressions. The pump itself didn't seem to be anything special. I do remember that they stated that they were going to supply Humalog only and I protested that I, for one, had no intention of switching from Novalog just to get the reservoirs pre filled. (I have no idea if they changed on that.)

I could see this as a plus for people who have trouble filling reservoirs without getting air bubbles.

A pump that used pen carterages always seemed like a good idea to me. I wonder why that never took off.
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Liz
post Apr 21 2011, 03:41 PM
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QUOTE(tedm @ Apr 21 2011, 05:47 AM) *
I recognize that pump. (IMG:style_emoticons/default/ohmy.gif) Several years ago, I was in a marketing study where they showed us a prototype pump and asked for our impressions. The pump itself didn't seem to be anything special. I do remember that they stated that they were going to supply Humalog only and I protested that I, for one, had no intention of switching from Novalog just to get the reservoirs pre filled. (I have no idea if they changed on that.)

I could see this as a plus for people who have trouble filling reservoirs without getting air bubbles.

A pump that used pen carterages always seemed like a good idea to me. I wonder why that never took off.


I really hate filling cartridges/reservoirs and would love a pump that used readily available, pre-filled pen cartridges. I'd be less excited about a proprietary, pre-filled reservoir.

One problem I see with this is that people who have smaller insulin needs might not want to use a pump that uses 300 unit reservoirs. While I personally have never experienced a problem using the same reservoir/insulin for a long period of time (my record is 15 days, when I was really watching my carbs) some people do claim that their insulin is less effective after only a few days. If you use only 25 units a day, that cartridge can last a long time. I believe Novolog is approved for 6 day use in a pump but I don't know about Humalog or Apidra. I see a lot of wasted insulin, which I'm sure Lilly doesn't care about!


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tedm
post Apr 25 2011, 01:00 AM
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The interesting thing is that the pen cartridges are approved for 28 days once started, just like vials. However, the pump reservoirs are approved, at least in the USA, for at most 6 days, once filled, and that's only for Novolog in Medtronic reservoirs. Both of those approvals are based on maximum temperature of 86F so that's not the difference. I'd bet that if someone did make a pump that took pen cartridges, they would not be allowed to advertise 28 days for a reservoir, for no good reason.

/Ted
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tedm
post Jul 9 2011, 05:33 AM
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A couple of weeks ago (sorry it took so long to post this), my local pumpersí support group had a representative make a presentation. He had with him a couple of live pumps that he passed around and we got to play with.

You may have heard about them pushing a ďpay as you goĒ pricing model. Hereís how that works: the pump is split into two parts that snap together, the control module and the pump body.

The control module is the permanent part that you buy once, probably to cost under US$1,000. It has the display and controls and the main microprocessor. If youíre familiar with the Omnipod, you can kind of think of it as the PDA, though it ends up being part of a tubed pump.

The bump body is use once, for up to 7 days, and then discard/recycle. It contains the mechanical part of the pump as well as a non-replaceable, non-rechargeable battery rated for 10 days under normal use. You could think of this as like the Omnipod pod.

You insert a standard Humalog pen refill cartridge into the pump body to use as a reservoir. (They may support other brands in the future but the cartridges are not compatible.) Once in the body, the cartridge is rated for 7 days use (you still change your set every 3 days, of course). You then attach a short tube adapter that ends in a standard Luer Lock to attach to tubing for the infusion set.

The cartridge is not removable without breaking the pump body (which youíre going to discard anyway) and the body will not work if you insert a not-full cartridge.

You can disconnect/reconnect the controller and body anytime you want; the controller has a small battery that charges from the body so that it can continue functioning.

An interesting aside: he claimed that insurance companies are interested in the pricing scheme, despite the higher ongoing costs. He claimed that insurance companies have a problem of paying $6,000 for a conventional pump and then the patient deciding not to use it. (Iím not so sure.)

Here are the other interesting features I wrote down:
  • Both the controller and the pump body keep a copy of the configuration. If you get a new controller, you can just snap in an old body and the controller will ask you if you want to copy the configuration from the body.
  • Four basal profiles.
  • Full bolus wizard but no food database.
  • Easier to read display with larger fonts; menus scroll side-to-side instead of up and down.
  • When you suspend and then restart the pump, it displays the missed basal and you can catch up with a few button presses.
  • Includes an LED flashlight that doubles as a visual alarm strobe to complement the audible alarms.
  • No vibrate alarm! (He claimed that it would draw too much power for their battery.)
  • Display of entered BG values on screen as a graph.
  • Detects occlusions by sensing pressure in the tubing instead of by resistance to the plunger; this allows faster detection.
  • Data downloads will occur by connecting the controller to a special body that has a USB port.

Their pump is overall about the same size as my MM 722 but longer. Itís also noticeably lighter than my 722. Also, like the MM pumps, itís rated water resistant but waterproof.

There were a number of things he couldnít talk about, as they havenít been published yet, for example, the bolus speed. He also couldnít talk to when the pump would be available because they need to build up their organization for manufacturing and support. He did imply that it would be at least a year before it would be available.

Sorry I don't have any photos, he asked me not to post any.

Overall, it was a very interesting presentation. I donít think the Pearl is for me, though it has some very nice features.
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Liz
post Jul 9 2011, 03:42 PM
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It sounds like this pump has some good features but not enough to make me all that interested. People who don't like or can't use Humalog are instantly excluded from their potential customer base. I think the lack of a vibrate alarm is a drawback for many people but I do like the idea of a flashing light alarm. The on screen BG graph is nice as is the missing basal calculator. Not being able to use a partially filled insulin cartridge isn't very smart. I suppose if needed you could fill a partial cartridge with a syringe from a vial to top it off. I know a lot of people will be wary of using the same cartridge for a week as some people complain of problems with their insulin even with 3 day use.


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