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> carbohydrate counting, new to learning how to count carbs please help
bmaillet
post Mar 15 2012, 05:23 AM
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hi im new to counting carbohydrates my sugars are really high on a ay to day basis i neverec learned t count carbs im on 2 insulin pens but switching to the minimed veo pump so i would like to learn to count carbs i need some help
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gigem99
post Mar 15 2012, 08:06 AM
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The obvious thing is to become religious about reading labels. I'm not sure whether you are in the U.S. or not, but if so, all packaged food has nutrition labels that list the amount of carbs.

Also, there is a great little book called 'Calorie King' that can be found at many bookstores and also online. Not only does it list various foods you can prepare yourself, but it also has nutrition information about many restaurants. They also have a website at www.calorieking.com.

Good luck - it's really not difficult, and your MM rep should be able to help you out quite a bit when you begin training for your pump.

Oh, yeah, I just remembered - you're getting a Veo which implies you're not in the U.S. Still, the calorieking website should be able to help you out. Maybe they have a European version

Just for a bit of guidance - I generally think in terms of 15 g of carbs. For example, a typical slice of bread is 15 g. A small baked potato is 15 g. A cup of cooked pasta is about 30 g.

Happy pumping!

Tom


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Liz
post Mar 15 2012, 04:02 PM
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QUOTE(bmaillet @ Mar 15 2012, 01:23 AM) *
hi im new to counting carbohydrates my sugars are really high on a ay to day basis i neverec learned t count carbs im on 2 insulin pens but switching to the minimed veo pump so i would like to learn to count carbs i need some help


I never counted carbs either until I got a pump. I don't know where you live, but here in the United States Minimed offers a bunch of free classes. I went to one on carb counting, and I was also sent to the dietitian by my endo.

There are a number of web sites that contain info on all kinds of food counts - carbs, calories, fat, protein. Tom mentioned Calorie King, which is a great site. Gary Scheiner has a great, easy to understand book on carb counting that I highly recommend.

If you don't already, get an electronic kitchen scale that weighs in grams. It really helps, at least in the beginning, to weigh your portions to get accurate counts. Nutrition labels on food packages are often wrong, at least in the USA. I believe they're allowed to be off by as much as 20%. I've weighed portions of bread items, like a roll, that weighed much more than the package said. If you're expecting a roll to contain 35 grams of carb but it actually contains 50, it can throw your Bgs way off.

Eventually you'll be able to estimate carbs by sight. In the beginning I did weigh & measure everything. I ate a lot of packaged foods at first because it was easier.


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Mrs O
post Mar 15 2012, 07:11 PM
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It can seem quite daunting initially but once you get going it does become easier.
Reading labels and a set of digital weighing scales is a must.
Calorie King is useful and there is a book called Carbs and Cals which is available on amazon, search the internet and you will no doubt find a lot of books and helpful information.
You will also be surprised at how much of the same things you eat.


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Manxman
post Mar 15 2012, 11:38 PM
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QUOTE(bmaillet @ Mar 14 2012, 10:23 PM) *
hi im new to counting carbohydrates my sugars are really high on a ay to day basis i neverec learned t count carbs im on 2 insulin pens but switching to the minimed veo pump so i would like to learn to count carbs i need some help


As an "old hand" at carb counting but always looking for new tools to be more accurate, I was disapointed to find that things like "Calorie King" and other books on this subject are not available as Nookbooks. I recently bought a Nook Color for use as an e-reader and tablet computer. However, today I found and bought this Nookbook,(which will only be of interest to you if you own one of the Nook e-readers): "Food, Glorious Food, the Nookbook Carb and Calorie Counter" . The cost was four dollars and change (have not downloaded it yet, and might not use it that much, but for a carb-counting newbie, this would be easy to keep around in your travels or at home).

Carb counting gets MUCH easier the more you practise. Another tip: if you eat cold breakefast cereal, take the plastic bag of ceral out of the cardboard box (this saves shelf space), use a "bag clip" to close up the bag as you measure out the cereal, and write the carbs per serving on the bag with "Magic Marker". Measure ALL of your food at home, and calculate the carbs from accurate measurements.

This post has been edited by Manxman: Mar 15 2012, 11:46 PM
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Mrs O
post Mar 16 2012, 06:52 AM
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Also, once you have done a few weeks of weighing food stuffs to count carbs correctly you will start to gauge how much a portion is which makes eating out a little easier. This can be very scary when you are new to the counting world.
Also find a small notebook and make notes of things that you regularly eat and the portion size, it's easier to refer to than weighing stuff all the time. This is also useful for eating out, look at the restaurant online if it's chain and make notes about the meals you would normally select. You will often found nutritional values for their menus on their websites.
I have done this for a few places, not that I would regularly eat those kind of foods but it is very handy. You don't need to write down the entire menu, if you would never eat fries for example don't bother making a note of them.
If you have an iPhone I am sure there are some useful apps, they seem to have them for just about everything else!!


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Packer Fan Dan
post Mar 18 2012, 10:52 PM
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Hi
When you read food labels, be sure to look how many servings are in the package. A bag of frozen mixed vegetables has 5 sevings in it. Each serving has 12 grams of carbs. There are a total of 60 grams of carbs in the bag. I use a food scale and Calorie King. com a lot. You can check how grams of carbs are in an ounce of the food you are going to eat. Weigh it and you've got the exact amount of carbs. The better you are at carb counting, the better your Diabetes will be under control. Thanks, Dan
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holka72
post Mar 22 2012, 11:18 PM
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I am starting my pump next week and have been real strict on the carb counting for about 3 months - I also use CalorieKing and am surprise how many food joints have websites that help with the counting. Sometimes it is a real surprise how many carbs are in some items.
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Liz
post Mar 23 2012, 03:33 PM
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QUOTE(holka72 @ Mar 22 2012, 07:18 PM) *
I am starting my pump next week and have been real strict on the carb counting for about 3 months - I also use CalorieKing and am surprise how many food joints have websites that help with the counting. Sometimes it is a real surprise how many carbs are in some items.


Anything that contains some kind of sauce can have way more carbs than you'd think. Also, if you're in a chain restaurant you can ask your server if they have nutrition info if you haven't found it on a web site.


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bkh
post Mar 24 2012, 03:21 AM
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My favorite comprehensive guide to the nutritional contents of food is the USDA SR24 program. http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place...earch/pcs24.exe
You run the program and type in just about any kind of food and they will give a listing of the nutrient content, in particular, carbs. They will tell the nutrients per item, such as a medium apple, but they will also tell per 100 grams. Example: I put in potatoes, and among the listings I see "Potatoes, microwaved, cooked in skin, flesh and skin, without salt." Turns out this has 24.24 grams of carb per 100 grams edible portion. That is, potatoes are 24% carb. So if I dish out a potato and it weighs 127 grams, then 24% x 127 = 30.48 call it 30 grams of carb. This is helpful for foods that are not prepackaged with a nutrition label.
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gigem99
post Mar 24 2012, 05:43 AM
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QUOTE(bkh @ Mar 23 2012, 09:21 PM) *
.... They will tell the nutrients per item, such as a medium apple, but they will also tell per 100 grams. Example: I put in potatoes, and among the listings I see "Potatoes, microwaved, cooked in skin, flesh and skin, without salt." Turns out this has 24.24 grams of carb per 100 grams edible portion. ....

This is really cool! Thanks a bunch for the link...I'm definitely checking this out - and comparing it to CalorieKing. I'm guessing it's going to be probably more accurate.

Tom


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Peter B
post Mar 24 2012, 10:33 AM
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QUOTE(bkh @ Mar 23 2012, 11:21 PM) *
My favorite comprehensive guide to the nutritional contents of food is the USDA SR24 program. http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place...earch/pcs24.exe
You run the program and type in just about any kind of food and they will give a listing of the nutrient content, in particular, carbs. They will tell the nutrients per item, such as a medium apple, but they will also tell per 100 grams. Example: I put in potatoes, and among the listings I see "Potatoes, microwaved, cooked in skin, flesh and skin, without salt." Turns out this has 24.24 grams of carb per 100 grams edible portion. That is, potatoes are 24% carb. So if I dish out a potato and it weighs 127 grams, then 24% x 127 = 30.48 call it 30 grams of carb. This is helpful for foods that are not prepackaged with a nutrition label.


bkh'
That appears to be neat quide! I'm going to try to use it for a bit to see how valuable it is for me.

Thanks for the heads-up!!

Peter B
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bkh
post Mar 24 2012, 08:04 PM
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That USDA database is also available for download of the underlying database files, or in pdf form in case you aren't running a windows PC. And it is possible to search it interactively over the web (but it might be a bit cumbersome on a smartphone) via http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/list
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