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> Possible cortisone shot
Suzan
post May 2 2012, 05:16 AM
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I will be seeing my family practice doctor tomorrow about an injury from falling. Instinct, and experience,
tells me that he will want to give me a cortisone shot. Similar situations in the past, have him telling
me that my BG will go up a bit and 'not to worry about it'. Well, it skyrockets and I do worry.
So, I am trying to devise a plan if I do get a cortisone shot. I figured that at the time of the shot
I could raise my basal rate until 2 hours before bed, test frequently and keep an eye on 'Dexie'. Then
I could take the basal closer to normal while I sleep. But I really have no idea of how much to
lower it. How have others handled this problem?
Of course, I could always refuse the cortisone (which is I always say that I will do the next time he
wants to give it to me), but I am tired of hurting.
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Linda B
post May 2 2012, 10:52 AM
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There are lots of anecdotes about cortisone shots posted in the forum. You could do a search and you will find the old posts.

Everyone's experience is different, so you will just need to experiment. The effects last for days, so if you find a basal percentage increase that seems to be working, you might not want to lower it too much at night, assuming you hear your Dexcom if it alarms.
On the other hand, if you sleep through alarms and through lows, then by all means, lower the percentage of the basal increase at night.

Linda B.



--------------------
Linda
Forum Moderator
Pumping with Minimed since 1995
Paradigm 530g w/ CGMS
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Suzan
post May 2 2012, 04:24 PM
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Group: Members
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From: Moss Landing, California
Member No.: 2,146
My Pump: Animas Ping, Dexcom



QUOTE(Linda B @ May 2 2012, 03:52 AM) *
There are lots of anecdotes about cortisone shots posted in the forum. You could do a search and you will find the old posts.

Everyone's experience is different, so you will just need to experiment. The effects last for days, so if you find a basal percentage increase that seems to be working, you might not want to lower it too much at night, assuming you hear your Dexcom if it alarms.
On the other hand, if you sleep through alarms and through lows, then by all means, lower the percentage of the basal increase at night.

Linda B.



Thanks, I went and read a post you started 2 or 3 years ago. It was interesting to read about the liver and what causes the rise. I wouldn't have thought of doubling the basal. If I put Dexie by my ear instead of under the covers or in a pocket, I should hear it.
I will take the basal up with care, like not driving until I see what happens, and frequent testing and glucose tabs at the ready.

Suzan
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